Covid
Photo
Diaries

  • 8 photographers
  • 1 virus

Covid Photo Diaries is a project created by eight prominent Spanish photojournalists who document, in different parts of the country and on a daily basis, the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.  

What is life in confinement like? What is this new daily life made of? How do we deal with the epidemic? We discover this through the photographs of Manu Brabo, Olmo Calvo, José Colón, Javier Fergo, Susana Girón, Isabel Permuy, Judith Prat and Anna Surinyach.  

The initiative begins with an account on Instagram where, since March 17, 2020, images captured in their homes, in their neighbourhoods, in their cities, or wherever there is a story to be told are published every day. They are accompanied by short texts in which their own authors or contributing editors give context, add their own sensations, and expand the descriptions of places, people, and events.  

Due to movement restrictions -after the state of alarm decreed on March 14-, the collective begins to photograph their closest surroundings, where each one lives: in Madrid, Barcelona, Zaragoza, Gijón, Jerez de la Frontera, and Seville. Little by little, with the help of NGOs and other organizations, they are expanding their scope and extending their coverage in the territory.   

"This project was born with the aim of being an interactive map of one of the most important events we have experienced in recent decades. In addition to the unquestionable relevance of documenting the day-to-day running of this health alert and its consequences for the population, there is the enormous value that this visual, plural and extensive testimony will have when everything is over. It will be the memory of what happened to us these days", say the photojournalists.   

Covid Photo Diaries is a collective and courageous response to the challenge of documenting a stage that is changing our lives. That is why we at Médicos del Mundo decided to support it. It is a new creative proposal to explore, inform, and face the current crisis together, and also, a way to support each other.

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A young man is seen on the air while doing stunts on San Lorenzo beach during the period authorized by the government to play sports during phase one of de-confinement in Gijón, Asturias, Spain. May 19, 2020.

A young man is seen on the air while doing stunts on San Lorenzo beach during the period authorized by the government to play sports during phase one of de-confinement in Gijón, Asturias, Spain. May 19, 2020.
I'm writing the text today. Maybe I'll do it every day from now on. Fabiola has started having contractions and is very tired. They are painful and prevent her from resting normally. At the hospital they told us that everything is perfect, so we have to wait. There is still a little while to go before the birth, but Iria is already preparing herself inside Fabiola. The passage from Madrid to the first phase has surprised us at home, taking care of us as good as possible so that everything goes well.

I'm writing the text today. Maybe I'll do it every day from now on. Fabiola has started having contractions and is very tired. They are painful and prevent her from resting normally. At the hospital they told us that everything is perfect, so we have to wait. There is still a little while to go before the birth, but Iria is already preparing herself inside Fabiola. The passage from Madrid to the first phase has surprised us at home, taking care of us as good as possible so that everything goes well.

José Colón


Barcelona

Daily exercises at the Gure-Etxea geriatric center residence.

Daily exercises at the Gure-Etxea geriatric center residence.

Javier Fergo


Jerez de la Frontera

Together with the start of Phase 2 of the pandemic de-escalation plan and the opening of beaches to bathing, the waste left by people returns to the sea. In the image, a plastic shoe returned by the sea at a beach in Cádiz.

Together with the start of Phase 2 of the pandemic de-escalation plan and the opening of beaches to bathing, the waste left by people returns to the sea. In the image, a plastic shoe returned by the sea at a beach in Cádiz.
Although everyone knows her as Pilar, legally her name is Mª Dolores. The story behind says that when Pilar was born, her mother, Mª Dolores, sent her father to register her newborn granddaughter. And when he arrived at the registry, the grandfather forgot the name that they told him to give the little girl, and then he deduced, wrongly, that the name would be the same as his daughter, Mª Dolores. The error was discovered 6 years later when they went to baptize the girl and discovered that Pilar was actually Mª Dolores. But she remains for everyone as Pilar, the same one who has finally been able to return to her home in Aracena, after spending all the confinement by COVID-19 at her niece's house. When she returns home after two months, she stares at the portrait of her mother, Mª Dolores, to whom she owes the name, although she is called Pilar.

Although everyone knows her as Pilar, legally her name is Mª Dolores. The story behind says that when Pilar was born, her mother, Mª Dolores, sent her father to register her newborn granddaughter. And when he arrived at the registry, the grandfather forgot the name that they told him to give the little girl, and then he deduced, wrongly, that the name would be the same as his daughter, Mª Dolores. The error was discovered 6 years later when they went to baptize the girl and discovered that Pilar was actually Mª Dolores. But she remains for everyone as Pilar, the same one who has finally been able to return to her home in Aracena, after spending all the confinement by COVID-19 at her niece's house. When she returns home after two months, she stares at the portrait of her mother, Mª Dolores, to whom she owes the name, although she is called Pilar.
Sara (28) was diagnosed with a mental disorder when she was 13 years old. Since then, she has needed help from the medical services on and off. When they declared the state of alarm, she was admitted, in the middle of a treatment. But in the hospital where she was being treated, they had to send all the patients from the unit, because they needed beds for the Covid-19. "They were collapsed, they couldn't do anything else," she explains with her understanding nature. The hardest thing for Sara has been not seeing her sister during these months, and staying active: "establishing a routine not to stay in bed is very important," she insists. Many people are in this situation, and often hide it for fear of being stigmatized. Perhaps this crisis, in which we have all been deprived of many things that we understood as "normal", will help us to be more tolerant and understand others more.

Sara (28) was diagnosed with a mental disorder when she was 13 years old. Since then, she has needed help from the medical services on and off. When they declared the state of alarm, she was admitted, in the middle of a treatment. But in the hospital where she was being treated, they had to send all the patients from the unit, because they needed beds for the Covid-19. "They were collapsed, they couldn't do anything else," she explains with her understanding nature. The hardest thing for Sara has been not seeing her sister during these months, and staying active: "establishing a routine not to stay in bed is very important," she insists. Many people are in this situation, and often hide it for fear of being stigmatized. Perhaps this crisis, in which we have all been deprived of many things that we understood as "normal", will help us to be more tolerant and understand others more.

Judith Prat


Zaragoza

Elvira is 87 and lives alone in Aguarón, a small municipality in Zaragoza province. Her son visits every day and she also gets home visits from Humildad, who works for the local home-help service. Elvira says she feels really well looked-after in these strange times in which she must stay at home in order not to contract Covid-19.

Elvira is 87 and lives alone in Aguarón, a small municipality in Zaragoza province. Her son visits every day and she also gets home visits from Humildad, who works for the local home-help service. Elvira says she feels really well looked-after in these strange times in which she must stay at home in order not to contract Covid-19.
Lourdes Cereceda has not hugged her son since the start of the pandemic. She sleeps and eats apart from the whole family for fear of infecting them. She is a nurse at the Can Ruti home hospitalization service, now that her workload has dropped, she has requested vacations so that, after 14 days without work, she can share hugs, kisses and meals with her family.

Lourdes Cereceda has not hugged her son since the start of the pandemic. She sleeps and eats apart from the whole family for fear of infecting them. She is a nurse at the Can Ruti home hospitalization service, now that her workload has dropped, she has requested vacations so that, after 14 days without work, she can share hugs, kisses and meals with her family.

El proyecto Covid Photo Diaries cuenta también con el apoyo de:

DKV

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